Free Game Rules!

Free Game Rules!

Tablero de Jesus
History:

It was very popular in Spain and in the Spanish possessions in the Low
Countries during the first half of the 15th century. It was banned by the
Pope in 1458, the ban enduring until the early 20th century!

Equipment:

2 six sided dice
7 x 7 playing board
30-40 coins

Rules:

Each player takes 15-20 coins (or hershey’s kisses or whatever the wager
is.) The object of the game is to make your opponent lose all of their
coins.

¨ Each player sets up three coins on their home row. Then, each player
rolls a die. Reroll ties. The low roller places thr center coin. The low
roller plays first and may reroll the dice.
¨ Having thrown the dice, the player loses them to his opponent on a
throw of 7, 11 or 12.
¨ On any other throw, he must move two coins, one per die, within the
same column, never diagonally or across. The player moves each coin
either away from or towards his side, by the number of rows
indicated by the dice.
¨ If the player is unable to use both dice, he moves neither coin and
passes the dice to his opponent.
¨ After having moved the coins, if there are two or more lined up in a
contiguous row (other than a home row), the player may take them
from the board. In that case, his opponent replenishes the vacated
columns from his own stake and then takes the dice. If the opponent
has an insufficient stake, the game is over.
¨ When receiving the dice, they must be thrown at least once. Keep
throwing and moving coins until either a move cannot be made or a
7,11,12 is rolled.
¨ If a row of seven coins is created, the moving player may announce a
“run”. The opponent must then stake two coins. The running player
throws the dice. On a 7, 11 or 12, he loses the run and his opponent
collects all nine coins. Otherwise, the player collects the two coin stake
and has the option of wagering again on the run and rerolling the
dice. This keeps on until the runner rolls 7, 11, or 12, the opponent is
unable to stake two coins, or the running player decides to take the
seven coins.
¨ The winner is the player with the most coins when the game is over.

Nine Men Morris
History:

Nine Men Morris or ‘Merels’ was popular in the 14th century, but earlier versions
have been found dating back to 1400BC in ancient Egypt. The Latin word merels
is often used for this game. The name comes from the low Latin word merrelus,
meaning a ‘token, counter or coin’. Several boards found in both Viking and
Anglo-Saxon contexts have had Hnefatafl on one side and Nine Men Morris on
the other.

The game was very popular in Scandinavia and the British Isles, and is still
played today in many parts of the world.

Equipment:

18 playing pieces, 9 dark and 9 light
Playing board – made up of three concentric squares connected by intersecting
lines in the center of each of the square’s sides.

Rules:

As with other medieval games, different rules have evolved over the years and
local variations may exist.

Players take turns placing one piece on an intersection, trying to form three in a
row, a ‘mill’. When a player forms a mill one of the opponents pieces is captured
and removed from the board.

When all 18 pieces have been placed, players now move their pieces around the
board one intersection at a time along the marked lines, trying to form mills and
make captures. When a player has been reduced to only 2 pieces left, they lose.

Variations:
Some rule sets also specify if you may capture a piece when it is protected in a
mill and if it is fair to move a piece out of a mill then right back again to form
another mill. Morris can also be played with 3, 6 or 12 pieces each.